Shots from the rehearsal room

I spent this last week in Pune, rehearsing with the cast at KCT.  We had more fittings and used the masks in rehearsal to discover any potential difficulties in comfort and sightlines.

Sunset Elephant!  I love it when I can conceal the eye-hole the actor looks through.
Sunset Elephant! I love it when I can conceal the eye-hole the actor looks through.
Mountain Monsters: Obsidian, Dacite and Copper. These characters hurl rocks (puppeteered by other cast members) down the mountain at Maya and her companions.
Mountain Monsters: Obsidian, Dacite and Copper. These characters hurl rocks (puppeteered by other cast members) down the mountain at Maya and her companions.
Hey Monkey Monkey!  I used close-fitting face masks for the monkeys, and you can see the actor's eyes move.
Hey Monkey Monkey! I used close-fitting face masks for the monkeys, and you can see the actor’s eyes move.

In the second act, there is a large dance featuring all sorts of animals, in a variety of masks styles that cover different amounts of the actors’ faces.

Queen Tiger leads a celebration dance
Queen Tiger leads a celebration dance. As we rehearsed, we only had to change minor details in spacing. Success!
Resting deer.
Deepak takes a rest in the dance rehearsal. Wearing a mask can be exhausting when you do the dance several times in a row!
Beast Feast!
Beast Feast! The Queen Tiger’s mask is based on a bicycle helmet. When dancing, it still rocked front to back too much, so we added a bamboo back harness (not pictured).

We also were finally able to try the full masks of the serpent Ska. There are some special tricks that these masks have to accomplish in the play, including the removal of three of the heads.

Priyanka surrounded by the sinful faces of the serpent Ska.
Priyanka surrounded by the sinful faces of the serpent Ska.
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Making it work

As a child,  I would often hear my father say: “There’s more than one way to skin a cat.” The most pressing thing on my mind at the time was: Why would one want to skin a cat at all? 

I still haven’t answered that question. However, I do know there’s more than one way to get something done.  And I have been trying a good number of approaches as I work on the masks for the Maya project: different styles, different materials, different processes.

This (currently ear-less) cat was sculpted on top of a bucket on top of an old dabba of ghee on a pedestal, and skinned with papier mache.
Ska, the 9 headed serpent, nears completion!  The foam snake body was sculpted by Sunil, and I made  the vice-laden faces to attach.
Ska, the 9 headed serpent, nears completion! The foam snake body was sculpted by Sunil, and I made the vice-laden faces to attach.

There’s also more than one way to feel successful. I think some of the success of a mask is measured by its accessibility. It is a really satisfying feeling when a person can pick up a mask I’ve made and instantly feel that they know what they will do with it. There is a feeling that the mask is strongly and clearly communicating its nature to the performer.

This parrot mask, modeled perfectly by  Shahish,  was built on basket augmented by newspaper, cardboard, and cello tape.
This parrot mask, modeled perfectly by Shahish, was built on basket augmented by newspaper, cardboard, and cello tape.

I’m not trying to say that masks can’t or shouldn’t be mysterious. Many a mask can take some work to get to know and to perform well. However, when there is a sense of recognition in the actor’s eyes because they can intuit the nature of the character, or see the possibilities in the mask, I feel I’ve done a good job.

Avian Evolution

Materials, working conditions, and needs of the performance are often in flux, so I find that adaptability is key. I have my preferred methods of creation when on my home turf, but while in India there are a number of differences. For example, used cardboard boxes, brown bags, and newspaper are not easy obtainium in Mumbai as they are in the US.  Here they are commodities that can be purchased if you know where to look. The challenge can then become to use what you have in front of you to get the work done.

Phase 1: A costume mock-up before I arrived
Phase 1: A costume mock-up before I arrived
Phase 2: Trying to improve the original
Phase 2: Adding detail and dimension to the original
Phase 3: Altering the position of the mask
Phase 3: Altering the position of the mask
Phase 4: Cutting it all up and putting it back together.
Phase 4: Cutting it all up and putting it back together.
Phase 5: Testing the altered mask on a new volunteer. Accessibility—and wearability—achieved!
Phase 5: Testing the altered mask on a new volunteer. Accessibility and wearability achieved!
Phase 6: Painted and rehearsal-ready!
Phase 6: Painted and rehearsal-ready!

Furthermore when working on a project as large as Maya, often previously approved ideas need to change slightly to serve the show. Sometimes the choreography, blocking, and the style of mask just don’t synch up and to be successful we find how we might change.In some cases, the choreography can be altered with minimal fussiness. In the case of our peacock character, Prasad was so amazing and alive in physical characterization that it was better to change the position of the mask to match what he was proposing.

Five Sprites, Please

IMG_4373Just a few days before all the basic structures and paint jobs were due, I was asked to make the antlers of the deer masks removable. This would permit easier shipping from venue to venue on the tour. I decided to use old bottles and their lids as the mechanism for this request. A 600 ml Sprite bottle had the perfect neck, but also a very short lid to which I could attach the wire and foam antlers. But it would have to do. I went out into the madness of the Dadar market to purchase five Sprites, trying to decide whether I would drink any or just pour it out. It was a hot day. But I couldn’t find a single one. Then I found a plastics shop (owned by Shahish, incidentally. See parrot pic) that carried long neck bottles with tall lids. Success!

IMG_4383
Thanks to my good friend Amy Jo, who shared this idea with me years ago.
Mama Tiger with ears and paint. atop a bike helmet, atop an actor.
Mama Tiger with ears and paint. atop a bike helmet, atop an actor.